how many branches of judaism has been influenced by Sabbatai Levy, the self-proclaimed messiah in1666?
His teachings are a strain of satanic cabalism.
Do you follow his teachings?

7 Responses to “How many jews here are sabbatian jews?”

  • MikeInRI:

    Whatever influence Sabbatai Levy had it pretty much disappeared when he converted to Islam (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabbatai_Zevi ). There was, however, nothing satanic about his beliefs.

    Good Luck!!!

  • Mark S:

    No, no one does. He was rejected by every single Jewish group after his death. There are zero followers today.

  • Christie W:

    i dunno im not jew sorry

  • DANIEL W:

    His influence and credibility disppeared in 1666 when he converted to Islam.

    There are no Jewish Sabbateans left today who believe that Sabbatai Tzvi was the Messiah.

    His teachings are Satanic – no doubt you can back this up with a credible source. He was a Kabbalist but there’s no such thing as Satanic Kabbalism.

  • lemoncream1:

    Not I.

  • Super Jew:

    You must be thinking of Shabtai Tzvi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shabbatai_Zvi). And you probably mean “kabbalah” not “cabalism”. Shabtai Tzvi was a false messiah, but that doesn’t make him “satanic”.

    I can pretty much guarantee you that you’ll find no Sabbateans here – there just aren’t any left. The only significant movement of Jews following a dead false messiah today is known as “Messianic Judaism,” and it is a branch of evangelical Protestant Christianity. And if someone claims to be a Sabbatean, they probably decided this on their own, but have no actual connection to Tzvi, his followers or their descendants.

    You see, when the Ottoman Sultan gave Shabtai Tzvi the option of conversion to Islam or death, he chose Islam. At that point, some of his followers became disillusioned with the whole thing and realized he couldn’t possibly be the one. Others folowed his lead and converted to Islam themselves.

    Those Sabbateans who converted to Islam, they and their children became known as “Donmeh,” and evidently they continued to maintain some Jewish practices in secret. Not sure if they still exist, but when I was in Istanbul, a good friend of mine, himself a rabbi, lived down the street from a mosque that was supposedly built by the Donmeh. Crazy.

    Anyway, I hope this helps clear up your confusion, or whatever confusion you might have caused those reading your question.

  • inat:

    Not Levy; Zvi.
    The people who still follow his teachings are no longer Jewish; they live mostly in Turkey.

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